All Posts By

Esther Tan

SkillsFuture @SG and the LELLE project @EU

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SkillsFuture Singapore (SSG) is a nation-wide movement to equip and to empower all Singaporeans with the necessary skills for the rapid changing market place both at the local front, as well as at the global platform. Primarily, it aims to foster a life-long learning culture with the vision for a competitive and a resilient work force. The SkillsFuture initiative also aligns with Singapore’s long-term vision for a future-ready Singapore; staying relevant in the 21st century with the tagline: Your Skills; Your Assets; Your Future. To drive and coordinate the Skillsfuture movement, two new statutory boards – SkillsFuture Singapore (SSG) under…

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Automated Feedback = Adequate Feedback?

By | English | 2 Comments

Recently, I had to call the bank over some credit card matters. Albeit I am no stranger to automated response, still the experience left me feeling demotivated to pursue the matter any further. I had expected to find at least some form of advice amid the rich list of standardized replies the buttons would generate … I supposed the bank didn’t or couldn’t pre-empt a situation as atypical as mine. I believe my frustration with automated replies is not unique. I began to recall my conversation earlier this year with a renowned professor in an interview on learning in the…

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Can MOOC foster deep learning?

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One of the growing concerns about MOOCs is the quality of the learning experiences and the learning outcomes. Amid the many debatable issues, one of the recurring themes is whether MOOCs can facilitate deep learning. Deep learning is commonly associated with meaningful learning, effective learning and/ or good learning. So what essentially constitutes deep learning and how does deep learning take place…

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‘Over-scripting’ MOOCs?

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The notion of over-scripting was first surfaced by Dillenbourg (2002) in the context of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). He cautions against over-scripting as it may unwittingly impede learning: make task completion unnecessarily challenging and demotivate the learner. The term ‘script’ was first used by Schank and Alberson (1977) to refer to cognitive structures or schemata, i.e., individuals possess procedural knowledge to act and to respond in everyday situations. A script in the CSCL context defines the sequence of activities, as well as structures interaction and collaboration to complete a global task. There are different types of scripts, e.g., induced scripts,…

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