All Posts By

Julia Kasch

By | Dissemination | No Comments

October last year I shortly introduced an instrument we developed which enables different stakeholders such as teachers, students, course designers and researchers to analyse the educational scalability of their course design when it comes to formative feedback. (You can read here more about it) I am glad to inform you that both the instrument and the corresponding paper are accessible online now! You can find the paper “A Framework towards Educational Scalability of Open Online Courses” here You can find the design analysis instrument here If you have any questions regarding the paper and/or the instrument feel free to contact…

Read More

Scalable Course Design in MOOCs?

By | English | No Comments

We all know that the quality of a course be it a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) or any other (open online) course, highly depends on the quality of the course design. Quality is a highly discussed topic in the literature and I don’t really want to go into it in depth but a very simple way of “measuring” the quality of a course design is by listening to the students the course is made for and the teachers who are teaching and maybe even did design the course. Students’ (dis)satisfaction regarding the design can tell you a lot about…

Read More

TEA conference presentation sum-up: Scalable peer-feedback design in MOOCs?

By | Dissemination, educational design, English, MOOCs, open education, Presentations, Publications, Reflection | No Comments

On Thursday 5 October I got the chance to present our pilot study about scalable peer-feedback design at the TEA conference (International Technology Enhanced Assessment Conference) in Barcelona. In this post, I want to give you a short overview of our study. Incentive of the study The motivation behind our study was to investigate whether and how embedded, student-focused peer-feedback design has an impact on student perception regarding peer-feedback. In the literature, peer-feedback is seen as a scalable way to manage large student numbers. Scalability often is approached by a quantitative perspective: “A MOOC is scalable because it provides education…

Read More

Where is the balance?

By | English | 2 Comments

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are, as the name suggests, courses with or for high student numbers. However, merely providing many students with information is not what education is about. MOOCs should and can enable deep learning, which implies that students have an active role during their learning process, engage in higher cognitive processes and relate new information to previous gained knowledge. Therefore, enabling deep learning can be seen as a criterion for MOOC quality. One simple but crucial aspect regarding the quality of MOOCs is that of constructive alignment. Do MOOC designers deliver what they promise? Are intended learning…

Read More

Scalable assessment and feedback in Open Online Education (OOE)?

By | English | No Comments

A growing challenge in education is to facilitate high-quality education for an increasing number of students. Within online education, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a great example of courses that are challenged by high student numbers when trying to support them. How can MOOCs provide high quality learning activities to high student numbers without increasing teacher time and without cutting down on quality?

Read More

Survey: Common and best practices in MOOC design

By | English | No Comments

What are your experiences with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)? Have you participated in one or several MOOCs? Have you been a teacher/tutor/assistant in a MOOC and/or did you ever (co-)design an MOOC? Do you think that the educational design of MOOCs could be improved?   Then share your knowledge and experience with us by participating in this research. This research is part of a study in the SOONER PhD project ‘Scaling support, feedback and interaction in open online education’, conducted by Julia Kasch (PhD student), Marco Kalz, (promotor) and Peter van Rosmalen (daily supervisor). Within this first study we want…

Read More