TEA conference presentation sum-up: Scalable peer-feedback design in MOOCs?

On Thursday 5 October I got the chance to present our pilot study about scalable peer-feedback design at the TEA conference (International Technology Enhanced Assessment Conference) in Barcelona. In this post, I want to give you a short overview of our study.

Incentive of the study
The motivation behind our study was to investigate whether and how embedded, student-focused peer-feedback design has an impact on student perception regarding peer-feedback. In the literature, peer-feedback is seen as a scalable way to manage large student numbers. Scalability often is approached by a quantitative perspective: “A MOOC is scalable because it provides education to large student numbers.” NO! It would be a shame to pursue a purely quantitative goal in education. What we want is high quality at large scale. That’s why we introduced the term ‘Educational scalability’ which is the capacity of an educational format to maintain high quality despite increasing or large numbers of learners at a stable level of total costs (Kasch, Van Rosmalen, Kalz, 2017, submitted).

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Author Julia Kasch

PhD student at the Welten Institute (Research Center for Learning, Teaching and Technology) of the Dutch Open University. Her PhD project is part of the SOONER project which is about the structuration of open online education in the Netherlands. Within her research she focuses on scalability solutions within Open Online Education regarding several aspects such as support, assessment and feedback methods. She is a member of the ICO research school (Interuniversity Center for Educational Sciences) and her background lies in Psychology and Learning Sciences. After completing her Bachelor (2013) and Master (2014) studies at Twente University, she worked at Bartiméus Foundation, as a researcher on a short term project (8 months). The Bartiméus Foundation provides education for blind and visually impaired children and young people. During her work at Bartiméus Foundation, Julia focused on supporting text comprehension, recall and information search in blind and visually students by adapting text designs.

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